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The Fulbright program history and ideology

The Fulbright awards program is one of the world's largest and most diversified educational exchange programs, sometimes termed The Flagship of educational exchange programs in the United States.  Approximately 4500 grants are awarded every year to "Fulbrighters" around the world.

The Fulbright program, designed to promote mutual understanding between the United States and the rest of the world, resulted from legislation sponsored by Senator J. William Fulbright 1905 – 1995 and was signed into law by President Harry Truman on August 1, 1946. It is composed of  bi-national agreements between the United States and more than 150 nations around the world, agreements that have been formed since World War II.
Through the program, grants are made out to U.S. citizens and nationals of the partner countries for a variety of educational and cultural activities, primarily to scholars, graduate students, and teachers.

To supervise the international exchange program, Congress established the Board of Foreign Scholarships, the J.William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.  It is composed of 12 educational and public leaders appointed by the President of the United States, and it has statutory responsibility under the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (Fulbright-Hays Act), as amended, for the selection of all Fulbright grantees.  Its supervision of the Fulbright program worldwide, includes the formulation of policy guidelines governing such exchanges.

From the beginning the board emphasized excellence as the fundamental standard for the Fulbright program. At its first meeting in 1946, the board pledged that ´in all aspects of the program the highest standards will be developed and maintained…the individuals to benefit will be of the highest caliber, persons who demonstrate scholastic and professional ability and whose personalities and characters will contribute to the furtherance of the program´.  Excellence has remained the hallmark of the Fulbright program, which is evident in the many notable achievements of Fulbrighters around the world.  Promoting peaceful understanding between the United States and the rest of the world has also remained its primary goal which is evident in the fact that it has been nominated to compete for the Nobel Prize for peace. 

The overall primary source of funding for the program is an annual appropriation made by the U.S. Congress to the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) at the US State Department, the agency that administers the program.  On an individual country basis, many partner governments contribute equally or more to the program in their own prospective countries.  ECA develops policies to assure fulfillment of the purposes of the program and administers it with the assistance of bi-national Fulbright commissions in some 51 countries that have executive agreements with the United States, and in 89 other countries with the assistance of American embassies.  The Bureau is also assisted in the administration of the Fulbright program by private U.S. organizations that facilitate international exchanges in higher education.  The Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES) assists in the administration of the Fulbright Scholar Program, and the Institute of International Education (IIE) assists in administering the Fulbright Student Program. The CIES and IIE are affiliated.

The Fulbright program history and ideology

The Fulbright awards program is one of the world's largest and most diversified educational exchange programs, sometimes termed The Flagship of educational exchange programs in the United States.  Approximately 4500 grants are awarded every year to "Fulbrighters" around the world.

The Fulbright program, designed to promote mutual understanding between the United States and the rest of the world, resulted from legislation sponsored by Senator J. William Fulbright 1905 – 1995 and was signed into law by President Harry Truman on August 1, 1946. It is composed of  bi-national agreements between the United States and more than 150 nations around the world, agreements that have been formed since World War II.
Through the program, grants are made out to U.S. citizens and nationals of the partner countries for a variety of educational and cultural activities, primarily to scholars, graduate students, and teachers.

To supervise the international exchange program, Congress established the Board of Foreign Scholarships, the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.  It is composed of 12 educational and public leaders appointed by the President of the United States, and it has statutory responsibility under the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (Fulbright-Hays Act), as amended, for the selection of all Fulbright grantees.  Its supervision of the Fulbright program worldwide, includes the formulation of policy guidelines governing such exchanges.

 

The Fulbright program history and ideology

The Fulbright awards program is one of the world's largest and most diversified educational exchange programs, sometimes termed The Flagship of educational exchange programs in the United States.  Approximately 4500 grants are awarded every year to "Fulbrighters" around the world.

The Fulbright program, designed to promote mutual understanding between the United States and the rest of the world, resulted from legislation sponsored by Senator J. William Fulbright 1905 – 1995 and was signed into law by President Harry Truman on August 1, 1946. It is composed of  bi-national agreements between the United States and more than 150 nations around the world, agreements that have been formed since World War II.
Through the program, grants are made out to U.S. citizens and nationals of the partner countries for a variety of educational and cultural activities, primarily to scholars, graduate students, and teachers.

To supervise the international exchange program, Congress established the Board of Foreign Scholarships, the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.  It is composed of 12 educational and public leaders appointed by the President of the United States, and it has statutory responsibility under the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (Fulbright-Hays Act), as amended, for the selection of all Fulbright grantees.  Its supervision of the Fulbright program worldwide, includes the formulation of policy guidelines governing such exchanges.

From the beginning the board emphasized excellence as the fundamental standard for the Fulbright program. At its first meeting in 1946, the board pledged that ´in all aspects of the program the highest standards will be developed and maintained…the individuals to benefit will be of the highest caliber, persons who demonstrate scholastic and professional ability and whose personalities and characters will contribute to the furtherance of the program´.  Excellence has remained the hallmark of the Fulbright program, which is evident in the many notable achievements of Fulbrighters around the world.  Promoting peaceful understanding between the United States and the rest of the world has also remained its primary goal which is evident in the fact that it has been nominated to compete for the Nobel Prize for peace. 

The overall primary source of funding for the program is an annual appropriation made by the U.S. Congress to the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) at the U.S. State Department, the agency that administers the program.  On an individual country basis, many partner governments contribute equally or more to the program in their own prospective countries.  ECA develops policies to assure fulfillment of the purposes of the program and administers it with the assistance of bi-national Fulbright commissions in some 51 countries that have executive agreements with the United States, and in 89 other countries with the assistance of American embassies.  The Bureau is also assisted in the administration of the Fulbright program by private U.S. organizations that facilitate international exchanges in higher education.  The Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES) assists in the administration of the Fulbright Scholar Program, and the Institute of International Education (IIE) assists in administering the Fulbright Student Program. The CIES and IIE are affiliated.

From the beginning the board emphasized excellence as the fundamental standard for the Fulbright program. At its first meeting in 1946, the board pledged that ´in all aspects of the program the highest standards will be developed and maintained…the individuals to benefit will be of the highest caliber, persons who demonstrate scholastic and professional ability and whose personalities and characters will contribute to the furtherance of the program´.  Excellence has remained the hallmark of the Fulbright program, which is evident in the many notable achievements of Fulbrighters around the world.  Promoting peaceful understanding between the United States and the rest of the world has also remained its primary goal which is evident in the fact that it has been nominated to compete for the Nobel Prize for peace. 

The overall primary source of funding for the program is an annual appropriation made by the U.S. Congress to the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) at the U.S. State Department, the agency that administers the program.  On an individual country basis, many partner governments contribute equally or more to the program in their own prospective countries.  ECA develops policies to assure fulfillment of the purposes of the program and administers it with the assistance of bi-national Fulbright commissions in some 51 countries that have executive agreements with the United States, and in 89 other countries with the assistance of American embassies.  The Bureau is also assisted in the administration of the Fulbright program by private U.S. organizations that facilitate international exchanges in higher education.  The Council for International Exchange of Scholars (CIES) assists in the administration of the Fulbright Scholar Program, and the Institute of International Education (IIE) assists in administering the Fulbright Student Program. The CIES and IIE are affiliated.

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